Making Copyright Exciting

It is challenging to encourage copyright education and engagement. Consider for a moment that we are at a convention or conference for educators. A speaker, and writer (specifically working on the name of the session), would have to an amazing job of engagement, selling, and courting for me to even considering attending.

 

Copyright just does not come up in deep conversations about education nor does it stir-up creative juices for helping students achieve learning outcomes. But I understand why it is important: an artist needs to get paid. It is unfair to use works that have not been legally acquired. Moreover, as Reynolds (2010) states “that the act of rewriting a culturally significant text from the perspective of a marginalized group serves important social purposes”. For authors in these situations, understanding, to the letter of the law, the rules within copyright are important, however, from the perspective of an english teacher making copies of a few pages of a text, one can see why copyright might be considered less important. The works that are copied are for educational purposes and not to make money. Many teachers have an attitude of apathy questioning the harm of going one page over the 10% limit.

 

How can attitudes about copyright be changed in education?

The short answer, to not bog down the important work, in the classroom for teachers, is to make it as accesible to learn about as possible: Infographics by copiers, free online educational seminars, or beginning of the year “how to guides”.

 

REYNOLDS, G. (2010). THE IMPACT OF THE CANADIAN COPYRIGHT ACT ON THE VOICES OF MARGINALIZED GROUPS. Alberta Law Review, 48(1), 35-53.

 

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